Leftfield Stage kicks Glastonbury off

A full bill of acts pack the tent

Leftfield Stage kicks Glastonbury off

Photographer: John Bownas22 June 2007

As the reports suggested, the rain came and a grubby Glastonbury Thursday ensued for the storm ready crowd.  The Leftfield Stage was the place to be, boasting a full line-up of entertainment throughout the day and a canvas big enough to keep out the sporadic and persistent showers.

Beans on Toast opened the tent with a crowd big enough for a headliner.  The political and witty singer songwriter jovially bounced his way through a set of comical left-wing acoustic ditties to the amusement of the soggy revellers.  Then 3 Daft Monkeys got the tent jumping and shouting with their blend of Celtic, gypsy folk. 

Then a young Dan Donnelly took to the second stage to continue the non stop music.  The Irishman’s opening chords were ‘Here Comes the Sun’ by The Beatles before he launched into one of his own numbers.  He looped his guitar riffs and created a drum beat by banging on his acoustic and playing it back.  Donnelly pleased the crowd by singing The Sex Pistols’ ‘Anarchy in the UK’’s lyrics over one of his own songs before singing his own words on top of television’s Formula 1 theme.

Virtual Festivals’ favourites and festival regulars Neck thumped their way through a very energetic Left Field set.  The six-piece warmed the crowd with Irish infused covers of ‘(White) Man In Hammersmith Palais’ by The Clash and The Sex Pistols’ ‘Anarchy In the Uk’.  The busy tent stomped their feet, clapped their hands and jigged their way through a highly entertaining performance.

Peaches Geldof and friends were among the wet audience who watched new indie scenesters Ox.Eagle.Lion.Man.  She was prepared for the poor forecast already: “I’m staying in a Winnebago so I’ve already got one up on everybody here,” she told VF. Her boyfriend, Frederick Blood-Royale’s band ruffled their way through an indie set worthy of a mention.  They played odd clips from their laptop over clever guitar work, before some problems silence the bass.  They soon sorted the sound and to give indie addicts their Thursday fix.

Seasick Steve was the act of the day as the tent heaved from pillar to post to see the blues master.  Accompanied by his ‘Diddy Bow’, the American gnarled his way through the first of his three appearances of the festival.  People were unable to move or get into the tent to hear his fantastic set.

Damien Dempsey added a little bit more of Ireland to the Leftfield Stage, which saw him produce a performance to complement the army of fans that pushed to the front to see him.  ‘Ghosts of Overdoses’ was the first big sing-a-long before the final track, ‘It’s All Good’ saw arms raised, lighters swaying in the air and a deafening chorus of voices.  Even when Dempsey had left the stage the crowd continued to belt out his last number.

'Emerging Talent' winner Liz Green didn’t get on stage until 1.40am but she beautifully warbled her way through a stunning acoustic set.  “Has anyone got the time?” She asked the crowd who lied to keep the Manchester singer songwriter playing longer. 

London acoustic act Sean Taylor closed the tent with grubby blues guitar work and raw lyrics.  His set didn’t start until 2.40am, but Glastonbury never sleeps.  The Leftfield Stage definitely got the party started today and the main stages haven’t even started yet!

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